View over the southern Drygalski Mountains in NW direction, peak on the right is the Ulvetanna. Credit: Wilfried Bauer,  Shot on 2014-03-01 Photo taken in , Antarctica.Licensed under: CC BY-SA 3.0.
View over the southern Drygalski Mountains in NW direction, peak on the right is the Ulvetanna. Credit: Wilfried Bauer, Shot on 2014-03-01 Photo taken in , Antarctica.Licensed under: CC BY-SA 3.0.

Here Antarctica and areas far north are combined together despite the areas being literally worlds apart. Climbing in Arctarctica is logistically challenging and correspondingly expensive. The most climbed objective is probably Mount Vinson for the fact that it is the highest and therefore one of the seven summits. Other than challenging weather it isn't particularly difficult. The same does not apply to some of the lower ranges, particularly Queen Maud Land where peaks like Ulvetanna rise vertically from the sea of ice. Greenland, perhaps a bit surprisingly, is best known for its rock rock climbing, as some of the fjords boast number of rock walls of Yosemite proportions. The same applies to Canadian Baffin island , where particularly Mount Asgard has attracted several elite parties during the years.

  • Arctic Cordillera Arctic Cordillera covers northeastern flank of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago from Ellesmere Island to the northeasternmost part of the Labrador Peninsula. The range is not too far from western Greenland. By far the best known part of the range is Baffin Island and in particular its Auyuittuq National Park. The park has several peaks with huge rock walls of big wall proportions. Here Mount Asgaard (2011m) is likely the best known destination.
  • Greenland Greenland is world's largest island and one of the least explored areas in the world. It is predominantly an ice cap with a rugged mountain chain which runs north to south up the East Coast. Greenland holds tremendous climbing potential for the future. Although several of the southern big wall arenas and alpine ranges have become increasingly popular there are still many unexplored regions even close to best known regions, not to mention virtually unclimbed areas in the northeast.
  • Svalbard
  • Antarctica Climbing in Arctarctica is logistically challenging and correspondingly expensive. The most climbed objective is probably Mount Vinson for the fact that it is the highest and therefore one of the seven summits. Other than challenging weather it isn't particularly difficult. The same does not apply to some of the lower ranges, particularly Queen Maud Land where peaks like Ulvetanna rise vertically from the sea of ice.

Greenland

Greenland is world's largest island and one of the least explored areas in the world. It is predominantly an ice cap with a rugged mountain chain which runs north to south up the East Coast. Greenland holds tremendous climbing potential for the future. Although several of the southern big wall arenas and alpine ranges have become increasingly popular there are still many unexplored regions even close to best known regions, not to mention virtually unclimbed areas in the northeast.

  • Northern Greenland
  • Western Greenland North of Cape Farewell area at the southern tip, the west coast of Greenland features numerous fjord systems. Lot of the peninsulas and the islands are littered with steep rock peaks, but none have become as famous as those at Cape Farewell area. Peaks are generally lower than those on the east coast and therefore the peaks are mostly interesting to alpine rock climbers, not so much for general alpinism. Due to area being disected with fjords, the west coast have few larger ranges, rather than a large number of islands and and peninsulas.
  • Eastern Greenland The highest ranges (Lemons, the Lindberghs, Watkins) are located on East Coast. Here lie Mount Gunnbjornsfjeld, the highest mountain in Greenland, is located on the central part of the East Coast approximately 45km from the coast.
  • Southern Greenland Cape Farewell area of south Greenland is rapidly becoming world famous for its big granite walls on peaks like Ketil and Ulamertorssuaq at the head of Tasermiut Fjord. Overshadowed by these few world class cliffs the climbing potential of the peaks in the rest of the region is rarely reported although the area between Tasermiut Fjord and Augpilatoq alone offers over 1000km2 of relatively accessible granite mountains rising with well-defended buttresses and faces from 1000m to 1500m out of the fjords. Every part of the region provides ranges of towers and spires equally impressive as the Chamonix Aiguilles.

May-early September. Due to northern location lots of daylight.

Western Greenland

North of Cape Farewell area at the southern tip, the west coast of Greenland features numerous fjord systems. Lot of the peninsulas and the islands are littered with steep rock peaks, but none have become as famous as those at Cape Farewell area. Peaks are generally lower than those on the east coast and therefore the peaks are mostly interesting to alpine rock climbers, not so much for general alpinism. Due to area being disected with fjords, the west coast have few larger ranges, rather than a large number of islands and and peninsulas.

  • Upernavik region Area located to the north of giant bays of Uummannaq and Disco bays.
  • Uummannaq Nuussuaq Peninsula and the areas north from it. The most famous peak of the area is Uummannaq (1170m).
  • Disco Bay Huge bay to the south of Nuussuaq Peninsula. The bay contains the large island of Disko.
  • Evighedsfjorden Peaks rise to above 2000m on both sides of Evighedsfjorden. Mount Atter (Taateral, 2190m) located on the north side of the fjord and Agssaussat (2140m) on the south side.
  • Maanitsoq Major fjord system between Evighedsfjorden in the north and Nuuk area to the south.
  • Nuuk Highly complex fjord system with multiple branches and many islands. The peninsulas and islands are littered with mountains, but none of them are particularly high or famous.

Eastern Greenland

The highest ranges (Lemons, the Lindberghs, Watkins) are located on East Coast. Here lie Mount Gunnbjornsfjeld, the highest mountain in Greenland, is located on the central part of the East Coast approximately 45km from the coast.

  • North of Scoresby Sound Scoresby Sound is the huge fjord system at the half way of Eastern´Greenland. Both the peninsula on itse north side as well as peninsulas and islands inside the fjord system are mountainous. The best known climbing are is Stauning Alps.
  • South of Scoresby Sound Large peninsula to the south of Scoresby Sound contains number of mountain ranges, particularly on the southern coast. Most explored of these ranges is Watkins Range, home to the highest peaks of Greenland.
  • Schweizerland Schweizerland is located somewhat further south, at about the same latitude as the northernmost parts of Iceland. The area is fairly popular, partially due to relatively short distance from the international airport in Kulusuk and the town of Tasiilaq.

North of Scoresby Sound

Scoresby Sound is the huge fjord system at the half way of Eastern´Greenland. Both the peninsula on itse north side as well as peninsulas and islands inside the fjord system are mountainous. The best known climbing are is Stauning Alps.

  • Stauning Alps Stauning Alps are located on the peninsula to the north of the most prominent fjord on the east coast, Scoresby Sound. The entire range consists of rugged alpine peaks reaching almost 3000m height. The range is one of the most explored in Greenland.
  • Liverpool Land Located close to the end of the main peninsula to the north of Scoresby Sound.
  • Ren Land Huge peninsula inside Scoresby Sound fjord system.
  • Milne Land Large island in side Scoresby Sound fjord system.

South of Scoresby Sound

Large peninsula to the south of Scoresby Sound contains number of mountain ranges, particularly on the southern coast. Most explored of these ranges is Watkins Range, home to the highest peaks of Greenland.

  • Lemons range Not as well known as Staunign Alps further north but according to expedition reports area featuring similar kind of very alpine peaks offering host of technical routes both on rock and ice.
  • Lindberghs range
  • Watkins range Watkins range is home to the highest peaks of Greenland, culminating at Gunnbjørn Fjeld (3700m). The peaks are generally higher but less dramatic than those in Stauning Alps or Lemons range.

Schweizerland

Schweizerland is located somewhat further south, at about the same latitude as the northernmost parts of Iceland. The area is fairly popular, partially due to relatively short distance from the international airport in Kulusuk and the town of Tasiilaq.

Southern Greenland

Cape Farewell area of south Greenland is rapidly becoming world famous for its big granite walls on peaks like Ketil and Ulamertorssuaq at the head of Tasermiut Fjord. Overshadowed by these few world class cliffs the climbing potential of the peaks in the rest of the region is rarely reported although the area between Tasermiut Fjord and Augpilatoq alone offers over 1000km2 of relatively accessible granite mountains rising with well-defended buttresses and faces from 1000m to 1500m out of the fjords. Every part of the region provides ranges of towers and spires equally impressive as the Chamonix Aiguilles.

  • Nanortalik peninsula Peninsula on the north side of Tasermiut fjord, across the famous peaks located on the south side.
  • Tasermiut fjord South side Tasermiut fjord is home of the most famous climbing objectives of southern Greenland, big walls of Ketil, Nalumasortoq and Ulamertorsuaq.

Svalbard

Antarctica

Climbing in Arctarctica is logistically challenging and correspondingly expensive. The most climbed objective is probably Mount Vinson for the fact that it is the highest and therefore one of the seven summits. Other than challenging weather it isn't particularly difficult. The same does not apply to some of the lower ranges, particularly Queen Maud Land where peaks like Ulvetanna rise vertically from the sea of ice.

  • West Antarctica
    • Antarctic Peninsula Long and prominent peninsula that is separated by 1000km from Tierre del Fuego, the southernmost tip of Patagonia. The entire peninsula is very mountaineous culminating at Mount Jackson (3184m).
    • Ellsworth Mountains
      • Sentinel Range Getting access to the climbs in the Antarctica used to be extremely difficult, not to mention prohibitively expensive. Nowadays commercial expeditions are organised. Ellsworth Mountains, south of the Antarctic Peninsula is the best-known and the highest of the ranges. 5140m Mount Vinson is located in Sentinel Range of Ellsworth mountains. It is the highest peak of Antarctica and by far the most climbed. Shinn, Mount Gardner and Mount Tyree are also occasionally climbed.
      • Heritage Range
    • Executive Committee Range The Executive Committee Range is a mountain range consisting of volcanoes in Marie Byrd Land, The highest of the volcanoes is Mount Sidley (4285m), the sole 4000m peaks of the range. The other main peaks include Mount Waesche and Mount Hampton.
  • Transantarctic Mountains The Transantarctic Mountains (abbreviated TAM) comprise a mountain range in Antarctica which extend, with some interruptions, across the continent from Cape Adare in northern Victoria Land to Coats Land. These mountains divide East Antarctica and West Antarctica. They include a number of separately named mountain groups, which are often again subdivided into smaller ranges. The highest peak of the range is Mount Kirkpatrick (4528m) with many other peaks rising to above 4000m.
    • Shackleton range
    • Pensacola Mountains
    • Thiel Mountains
    • Whitmore Mountains
    • Queen Maud Mountains
      • Queen Alexandra range
      • Queen Elizabeth Range
    • Thiel Mountains
  • East Antarctica Eastern Artarctica contains several ranges
    • Fimbulheimen Probably the most spectacular peaks on Antarctica are to be found in Queen Maud lands where impressive spires of Ulvetanna-group have attracted several famous climbers to put high profile and very difficult routes on them. The group consist of spires with vertical rock walls rising for hundreds of meters from the flat glacier. Most famous peaks are Holtanna and Ulvetanna. Due to very low temperatures it's hardly surprising that most (all) routes involve aid climbing.
    • Thorshavnheiane
    • Scott Mountains
    • Prince Charles Mountains
  • Gildea, Damien: Mountaineering in Antarctica - Climbing in the Frozen South. Isbn: 9782875230065. Nevicata, 2010.

Sentinel Range

Getting access to the climbs in the Antarctica used to be extremely difficult, not to mention prohibitively expensive. Nowadays commercial expeditions are organised. Ellsworth Mountains, south of the Antarctic Peninsula is the best-known and the highest of the ranges. 5140m Mount Vinson is located in Sentinel Range of Ellsworth mountains. It is the highest peak of Antarctica and by far the most climbed. Shinn, Mount Gardner and Mount Tyree are also occasionally climbed.

Climbing is done during the Antarctis summer (december - february). Even then the average temperature is around -30 to -40°C. Access to the ranges is by plane from Punta Arenas in Chile to Union Glacier Camp followed by shorter flight to the mountains.

Fimbulheimen

Probably the most spectacular peaks on Antarctica are to be found in Queen Maud lands where impressive spires of Ulvetanna-group have attracted several famous climbers to put high profile and very difficult routes on them. The group consist of spires with vertical rock walls rising for hundreds of meters from the flat glacier. Most famous peaks are Holtanna and Ulvetanna. Due to very low temperatures it's hardly surprising that most (all) routes involve aid climbing.

Mountains

Greenland

Northern Greenland

Greenland

Roosevelt Range
Mara Mountain83.566666667-30.4666666671155
1998-07-14
Mara Mountain, ,
First ascent
Top of The World Expedition
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Western Greenland

Greenland

Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Eastern Greenland

Greenland

Watkins Range
Gunnbjørn Fjeld (Gunnbjørn)68.916666667-29.7833333333700
1935-08-16
Gunnbjørn Fjeld, ,
First ascent
Augustine Courtauld, Jack Longland, Ebbe Munck, Harold G. Wager, Lawrence Wager
Schweizerland 
Mont Forel66.933333333-36.8166666673360
1938-01-01
Mont Forel, ,
First ascent
Swiss expedition of the Akademischer Alpen-Club of Zürich led by André Roch
Stauning Alps
Dansketinden72.126389-24.9552782831
1954-08-05
Dansketinden, ,
First ascent
John Haller, Wolfgang Diehl, Fritz Schwarzenbach
Norsketinden72.136111-25.0555562797
1954-08-07
Norsketinden, ,
First ascent
Danish–Norwegian expedition
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Southern Greenland

Greenland

Lindenow Fjord
Tiningnertok (Apostelen Tommelfinger)60.598333-43.8202782291
1976-01-01
Tiningnertok, ,
First ascent
Expedition led by Frenchman Sylvain Jouty
Tasermiut fjord
Nalumasortoq (Naluumasortoq)60.386667-44.4694442045
1974-01-01
Nalumasortoq, ,
First ascent
Party from
1974-01-01
Nalumasortoq, SE face,
First ascent
SE face:
1975-01-01
Nalumasortoq, South face,
First ascent
South face:
2000-01-01
Nalumasortoq, Non c’è Due Senza Tre,
First ascent
Non c’è Due Senza Tre: Italian party
    SE face. 1974-01-01Nalumasortoq, SE face, First ascent , 1974.
    South face. 1975-01-01Nalumasortoq, South face, First ascent , 1975.
    1000, rock face with three prominent pillars.
    Non c’è Due Senza Tre. 6c,A3/5.11b; 850m. 2000-01-01First ascentItalian party, 2000.
    West Face of the Third Pillar.
Ketil (Uiluit Qaqqaa)60.416666667-44.5166666672003
1974-01-01
Ketil, ,
First ascent
Party from
Ulamertorsuaq60.376389-44.5422221858
1977-01-01
Ulamertorsuaq, ,
First ascent
Party from
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Greenland

Roosevelt Range

Mara Mountain83.566666667-30.4666666671155
1998-07-14
Mara Mountain, ,
First ascent
Top of The World Expedition
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Greenland

Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Greenland

Watkins Range

Gunnbjørn Fjeld (Gunnbjørn)68.916666667-29.7833333333700
1935-08-16
Gunnbjørn Fjeld, ,
First ascent
Augustine Courtauld, Jack Longland, Ebbe Munck, Harold G. Wager, Lawrence Wager

Schweizerland 

Mont Forel66.933333333-36.8166666673360
1938-01-01
Mont Forel, ,
First ascent
Swiss expedition of the Akademischer Alpen-Club of Zürich led by André Roch

Stauning Alps

Dansketinden72.126389-24.9552782831
1954-08-05
Dansketinden, ,
First ascent
John Haller, Wolfgang Diehl, Fritz Schwarzenbach
Norsketinden72.136111-25.0555562797
1954-08-07
Norsketinden, ,
First ascent
Danish–Norwegian expedition
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Greenland

Lindenow Fjord

Tiningnertok (Apostelen Tommelfinger)60.598333-43.8202782291
1976-01-01
Tiningnertok, ,
First ascent
Expedition led by Frenchman Sylvain Jouty

Tasermiut fjord

Nalumasortoq (Naluumasortoq)60.386667-44.4694442045
1974-01-01
Nalumasortoq, ,
First ascent
Party from
1974-01-01
Nalumasortoq, SE face,
First ascent
SE face:
1975-01-01
Nalumasortoq, South face,
First ascent
South face:
2000-01-01
Nalumasortoq, Non c’è Due Senza Tre,
First ascent
Non c’è Due Senza Tre: Italian party
    SE face. 1974-01-01Nalumasortoq, SE face, First ascent , 1974.
    South face. 1975-01-01Nalumasortoq, South face, First ascent , 1975.
    1000, rock face with three prominent pillars.
    Non c’è Due Senza Tre. 6c,A3/5.11b; 850m. 2000-01-01First ascentItalian party, 2000.
    West Face of the Third Pillar.
Ketil (Uiluit Qaqqaa)60.416666667-44.5166666672003
1974-01-01
Ketil, ,
First ascent
Party from
Ulamertorsuaq60.376389-44.5422221858
1977-01-01
Ulamertorsuaq, ,
First ascent
Party from
Mount Paatusoq60.881944-43.7488892740
1962-01-01
Mount Paatusoq, ,
First ascent
Austro-German Greenland Expedition led by Austrian alpinist Toni Dürnberger

Antarctica

West Antarctica

Elseworth Mountains

Sentinel Range
Vinson massif
Mount Vinson-78.5252777777778-85.61694444444444892
Mount Vinson is the highest mountain of Antarctica and thus one of the seven summits. It is a massive peak with number of summits. Normal routes are easy offering no particular technical difficulties.
1966-12-18
Mount Vinson, ,
First ascent
Barry Corbet, John Evans, Bill Long, Pete Schoening
    Branscombe glacier & Vinson Shin col. F; 2200m.
    Normal route. Long glacier climb with no particular difficulties. From Branscombe glacier (Base Camp at 2134m) to the col between Vinson Massif and Mount Shinn. From there 5 km to the summit. Two or three high camps.
Príncipe de Asturias Peak-78.5472222222222-85.70888888888894680
1995-01-23
Príncipe de Asturias Peak, ,
First ascent
Manuel Álvarez, Alfonso Juez
Mount Tyree-78.4-85.91666666666674852
The second highest peak of Antarctica, located just 13km northwest of Vinson Massif. The peaks is far more difficult than Vinson massif and lacks the status of being the highest peak of the continent, therefore very few people attemp to climb it.
1967-01-01
Mount Tyree, Corbet's Couloir,
First ascent
Corbet's Couloir: John Evans & Barry Corbet
1967-01-06
Mount Tyree, ,
First ascent
John Evans, Barry Corbet
1989-01-01
Mount Tyree, West face,
First ascent
West face: Terry Stump
1997-01-01
Mount Tyree, French route,
First ascent
French route: Antoine de Choudens & Antoine Cayrol
    Corbet's Couloir
    Corbet's Couloir. Ice, 1967-01-01First ascentJohn Evans & Barry Corbet, 1967-01.
    West face
    West face. 1989-01-01First ascentTerry Stump, 1989-01.
    French route
    French route. 1997-01-01First ascentAntoine de Choudens & Antoine Cayrol, 1997.
    South face
    Still-unclimbed south face is 2000m face is one of the largest in Antarctica.
Mount Gardner-78.383333-86.0333334685
    Mount Shinn-78.45-85.76666666666674660
    1966-12-21
    Mount Shinn, ,
    First ascent
    Barry Corbet, Charles Hollister, Sam Silverstein, Richard Wahlstrom
      Mount Rutford-78.6-85.34477
      2006-12-09
      Mount Rutford, ,
      First ascent
      Jed Brown, Camilo Rada, Pachi Ibarra
      Mount Anderson-78.15-86.21666666666674254
      2007-01-07
      Mount Anderson, ,
      First ascent
      Jed Brown, Damien Gildea
      Mount Bentley-78.1166666666667-86.23333333333334245
      1998-01-01
      Mount Bentley, ,
      First ascent
      Veikka Gustafsson, Patrick Degerman
      Mount Davis3950
      1998-01-01
      Mount Davis, ,
      First ascent
      Veikka Gustafsson, Patrick Degerman
      Peak 4111-78.2166666666667-86.13333333333334160
      1996-01-13
      Peak 4111, ,
      First ascent
      Erik Decamp, Catherine Destivelle

      Executive Committee Range

      Mount Sidley-77.033333-126.14285
      1990-01-11
      Mount Sidley, ,
      First ascent
      Bill Atkinson

      Antarctic Peninsula

      Mount Jackson3184
      1964-01-01
      Mount Jackson, ,
      First ascent
      John Cunningham

      Transantarctic Mountains

      Transantarctic Mountains

      Queen Maud Mountains
      Queen Alexandra Range
      Mount Kirkpatrick-84.333333166.4166674528
      1991-01-01
      Mount Kirkpatrick, ,
      First ascent
      Party from
      Mount Fridtjof Nansen4070
      1962-01-01
      Mount Fridtjof Nansen, ,
      First ascent
      Wally Herbert, McGregor, Otway, Pain
      Admiralty Mountains
      Mount Minto-71.783333168.754165
      1988-02-01
      Mount Minto, ,
      First ascent
      Australian party
      Mount Adam-71.783333168.6166674010
      1981-01-01
      Mount Adam, ,
      First ascent
      Party from New Zealand
      Mount Herschel-72.2169.5166673335
      1967-01-01
      Mount Herschel, ,
      First ascent
      Sir Edmund Hillary
      Royal Society Range
      Mount Lister4025
      1962-12-01
      Mount Lister, ,
      First ascent
      Party from
      Mount Markham
      1985-01-01
      Mount Markham, ,
      First ascent
      Party from
      Mount Erebus-77.529722167.1533333794
      1908-01-01
      Mount Erebus, ,
      First ascent
      Edgeworth David and party

      East Antarctica

      Fimbulheimen

      Orvin Mountains
      Filchner Mountains
      Rakekniven Peak-71.97.283333333333332365
      1997-01-03
      Rakekniven Peak, ,
      First ascent
      Conrad Anker, Mike Graber, Jon Krakauer, Alex Lowe, Rick Ridgeway, Gordon Wiltsie
      Drygalski Mountains
      Ulvetanna (Ulvetanna Peak)-71.858.333333333333332931
      Ulvetanna Peak (Norwegian: the wolf's tooth) is a sharp peak (2930m) in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. Ulvetanna lies about 3km north of Kinntanna Peak in the Fenriskjeften Mountain in the east part of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. The peak was discovered fairly recently from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Ulvetanna. Since then there has been few ascents, all involving at least some aid to overcome steep rock and cold weather.
      1994-01-01
      Ulvetanna, NW face,
      First ascent
      NW face: Robert Caspersen, Sjur Nesheim & Ivar Tollefsen
      1994-02-02
      Ulvetanna, ,
      First ascent
      Robert Caspersen, Sjur Nesheim, Ivar Tollefsen
      2006-11-20
      Ulvetanna, North face,
      First ascent
      North face: Robert Caspersen, Ivar Tollefsen, Stein-Ivar Gravdal & Trond Hilde
      2008-01-01
      Ulvetanna, Sound of Silence,
      First ascent
      Sound of Silence: Alexander Huber, Thomas Huber & Stephan Siegrist
      2013-01-01
      Ulvetanna, NE ridge,
      First ascent
      NE ridge: Leo Houlding, Sean Leary, Jason Pickles & Chris Rabone
      2014-02-03
      Ulvetanna, South ridge,
      First ascent
      South ridge: Andy Kirkpatrick,Aleks Gamme,Kjersti Eide,Espen Fadnes,Ingeborg Jackobsen,Jonas Langseth
      North face
      North face. A4,5.9/5.10; 21 pitches. 2006-11-20First ascentRobert Caspersen, Ivar Tollefsen, Stein-Ivar Gravdal & Trond Hilde, 2006-11-20.
      NE ridge
      NE ridge (The Last Great Climb). 5.12,A2/E6 6b,A2/C2; 35 pitches, 1750m. 2013-01-01First ascentLeo Houlding, Sean Leary, Jason Pickles & Chris Rabone, 2013.
      Documented in film http://www.thelastgreatclimb.com/ The Last Great Climb The 2013 film from Alastair Lee is an epic to end all mountain epics set in the stunning mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. The feature length documentary covers top adventure climber Leo Houlding with his tried and tested team of Jason Pickles and Sean 'Stanley' Leary as they attempt to make the first ascent of the NE ridge of the master piece of the range; the majestic Ulvetanna Peak. One of the most technically demanding climbs in one of the world's harshest environments. Behind the lens galleries here. THE LAST GREAT CLIMB promises to be quite simply one of the most spectacular mountaineering films ever made. Out November 2013 2013 Alastair Lee Antarctica Ulvetanna Leo Houlding .
      South ridge
      South ridge. E2 5b,A1/5.10,A1; 27 pitches. 2014-02-03First ascentAndy Kirkpatrick,Aleks Gamme,Kjersti Eide,Espen Fadnes,Ingeborg Jackobsen,Jonas Langseth, 2014-02-03.
      NW face
      NW face. 7a+,A2, 70°; 990m. 1994-01-01First ascentRobert Caspersen, Sjur Nesheim & Ivar Tollefsen, 1994.
      Sound of Silence (West ridge, NW buttress). 5.11-,A2; 800m, 20 pitches. 2008-01-01First ascentAlexander Huber, Thomas Huber & Stephan Siegrist, 2008.
      Holtanna Peak-71.98.366666666666672650
      North pillar
      Skywalk. VI+; 450m, 10 pitches. 2008-01-01First ascentAlexander Huber, Thomas Huber, Stephan Siegrist & Max Riechel, 2008.
      NE face
      NE face. 6b,A2; 500m.
      West face
      Eiszeit (Ice age). VII,A4; 750m, 24 pitches. 2008-01-01First ascentAlexander Huber, Thomas Huber, Stephan Siegrist & Max Riechel, 2008.
      Zardoz. A4, Sco VII; 10 pitches. 2014-01-01First ascentAndy Kirkpatrick,Jonas Langseth, 2014-01.
      South pillar
      South pillar. 6b,A2/3.