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The Summit

Source: . Credit: http://www.impawards.com .
Source: IMP Awards. Credit: http://www.impawards.com .

I recently discovered that a film about 2008 K2 disaster called The Summit had gone unnoticed by me. It's cast certainly isn't as impressive as that of upcoming Everest but being the movie-buff I am, I clearly have to watch this one too.

Tragic events of August 1st and 2nd 2008 on the Abruzzi RidgeK28611mSouth sideIII, 50° have also been covered in several books, at least The Time Has Come: Ger Mcdonnell - His Life & His Death on K2.O'brien, DamienCollins Pr2012Damien O'Brien is married to Ger McDonnell's sister, Denise. A keen sports fan, especially of GAA, Damien spent 3 years as chairman of his local GAA club. He was fascinated listening to Ger tell his stories and was delighted to write this book in his honour.97818488914329781848891432The Time Has ComeNon-fictionen, No Way Down: Life and Death on K2.Bowley, GrahamHarpercollins2011In the tradition of Into Thin Air and Touching the Void, No Way Down by New York Times reporter Graham Bowley is the harrowing account of the worst mountain climbing disaster on K2, second to Everest in height... but second to no peak in terms of danger. From tragic deaths to unbelievable stories of heroism and survival, No Way Down is an amazing feat of storytelling and adventure writing, and, in the words of explorer and author Sir Ranulph Fiennes, “the closest you can come to being on the summit of K2 on that fateful day.”On August 1, 2008, no fewer than eight international teams of mountain climbers—some experienced, others less prepared—ascended K2, the world's second-highest mountain, with the last group reaching the summit at 8 p.m. Then disaster struck. A huge ice chunk came loose above a deadly three-hundred-foot avalanche-prone gully, destroying the fixed guide ropes. More than a dozen climbers—many without oxygen and some with no headlamps—faced the nearly impossible task of descending in the blackness with no guideline and no protection. Over the course of the chaotic night, some would miraculously make it back. Others would not. In this riveting work of narrative nonfiction, journalist Graham Bowley re-creates one of the most dramatic tales of death and survival in mountaineering history.97800618347909780061834790No Way DownNon-fictionen, K2: Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain, 1 Reprint Edition.Viesturs, EdBroadway Books2010Ed Viesturs, one of the world's premier high-altitude mountaineers, explores the remarkable history of K2 and of those who have attempted to conquer it. At the same time, he probes the mountain's most memorable sagas in order to illustrate lessons about the fundamental questions mountaineering raises—questions of risk, ambition, loyalty to one's teammates, self-sacrifice, and the price of glory. Viesturs knows the mountain firsthand. He and renowned alpinist Scott Fischer climbed it in 1992 and got caught in an avalanche that sent them sliding to almost certain death before Ed managed to get into a self-arrest position with his ice ax and stop both his fall and Scott's.Focusing on seven of the mountain's most dramatic campaigns, from his own troubled ascent to the 2008 tragedy, Viesturs crafts an edge-of-your-seat narrative that climbers and armchair travelers alike will find unforgettably compelling. With photographs from Viesturs's personal collection and from historical sources, this is the definitive account of the world's ultimate mountain, and of the lessons that can be gleaned from struggling toward its elusive summit.97807679326089780767932608K2: Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous MountainNon-fictionen, One Mountain Thousand Summits: The Untold Story of Tragedy and True Heroism on K2, Paperback Edition.Wilkinson, FreddieNew American Library2011One Mountain Thousand Summits reveals the true story of the K2 tragedy that claimed the lives of eleven men. Based on his numerous trips to Nepal and in-depth interviews he conducted with the survivors, the families of the lost climbers, and the Sherpa guides whose heroic efforts saved the lives of at least four climbers, Freddie Wilkinson's narrative uncovers what actually occurred on the mountain, while delivering a criticism of the mainstream press's incomplete coverage of the event, and an insightful look into the lives of the six Sherpas who were involved.97804512333189780451233318One Mountain Thousand SummitsNon-fictionen, K2 Surviving Three Days in the Death Zone, 1th Edition Edition.Rooijen, Wilco van & Thurman, RogerG+J Publishing CV2010In the summer of 2008 the 'Norit K2 expedition' climbed without additional oxygen the 8611 meter high peak of K2 in Pakistan. During the descent the expedition turned from triumph to tradedy. One of the biggest tradedy's in mountain climbing history. Statistical every quarter 'conqueror' will die on the "Killer Mountain". In 2008 11 climbers lost their life. The news was going over the whole world from CNN, Al-Jazeera, Sky News, BBC, New York Times etc.Wilco van Rooijen, the Dutch expedition leader has been missing for three days and give up by the outside world. On his last strength he came back a life out of the 'Death Zone'. The 'Norit K2' Expedition 2008 paid a high price. What exactly took place that August 1, 2008? How could this tragedy have taken place?97890892704679789089270467Surviving K2Non-fictionen and The Summit: How Triumph Turned to Tragedy on K2's Deadliest Days.Falvey, Pat & Pemba, Sherpa GyaljeO'brien Press Ltd2013On 1 August 2008, 18 climbers from across the world reached the summit of K2, the world's second highest and most dangerous mountain - a peak which claims the life of one in every four climbers who attempt it. Over the course of 28 hours, however, K2 had exacted a deadly toll: 11 lives were lost in a series of catastrophic accidents. Attracting a climbing elite and standing at 8,611 metres on the Pakistan-China border, K2 is known as the 'Mountaineer's Mountain' because of its extreme technical challenges, its dangerously unpredictable weather and an infamous and hazardous overhanging wall of ice known as the Serac. Snow-bound at Base Camp for weeks on end and increasingly despairing of their prospects of success, an unexpected weather window gave the climbers the opportunity they were waiting for. In their collective desire to reach the summit, seven expeditions agreed to co-ordinate their efforts and share their equipment. Triumph quickly turned to tragedy, however, when a seemingly flawless plan unravelled with lethal consequences. Over the course of three days, a Nepalese Sherpa called Pemba Gyalje, along with five other Sherpas, was at the centre of a series of attempts to rescue climbers who had become trapped in the Death Zone, unable to escape its clutches and debilitated by oxygen deprivation, chronic fatigue, delirium and a terrifying hopelessness. The tragedy became a controversy as the survivors walked from the catastrophe on the mountain into an international media storm, in which countless different stories emerged, some contradictory and many simply untrue. Based on Pemba Gyalje's eyewitness account and drawing on a series of interviews with the survivors which were conducted for the award-winning documentary, The Summit (Image Now Films and Pat Falvey Productions, 2012), The Summit: How Triumph Turned to Tragedy on K2's Deadliest Days is the most comprehensive interpretation of one of modern-day mountaineering's most controversial disasters.97818471764319781847176431The SummitNon-fictionen. Obviously there is no shortage of articles covering the disaster in main stream media including: Few False Moves, K2 tragedy: 'We had no body, no funeral, no farewell ...' and K2: The Killing Peak. Unfortunately this is not the first time when large group of climbers were held captive high on K2 with catastrophic results: 1986 K2 disaster.

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